Dame Margot Fonteyn De Arias

Because the 18th of May is the birth date of Dame Margot Fonteyn De Arias, and she will have been 100 years old this year, I thought it fitting to write an article about this wonderful lady and dancer.

Dame Margot Fonteyn was born on the 18th of May 1919 as Margaret Hookham in Reigate, England.

In case you are wondering who she is, she was an outstanding and beloved classical ballerina with an extensive career that spanned from 1934 to 1979. She danced for England’s Royal Ballet which put British Ballet on the international map.

dame margot fonteyn de arias

Her father was British and her mother, Hilda, was the daughter of an Irish mother and a Brazilian father. Margot had one brother called Felix.

They both grew up happily in the London suburb of Ealing and Margot began dancing classes at the age of four at a local dance school.

Her father accepted a position as chief engineer of a tobacco company in Shanghai when Margo was eight, so that is where they moved.

In Shanghai, she took lessons from George Goncharov. She loved moving and was always creating dances of her own.

When she was fourteen her mother brought her to London to give her a chance to develop a dancing career.

She started lessons with Serafina Astafieva and then moved on to the Sadler’s Wells Ballet School with Vera Volkova.

She got her stage name in England of Margot Fonteyn, which indirectly evolved from her mother’s family name, Fontes.

Dame Margot Fonteyn De Arias devoted her entire career to the Royal Ballet.

The Royal Ballet was founded by Ninette de Valois in 1928 as the Vic-Wells/Sadler’s Wells Ballet. Ninette de Valois believed in Fonteyn’s talent and pushed her through difficult moments.margot fonteyn

She made her debut as a snowflake in the Nutcracker in 1934 and then the next year in a wealth of dance roles in the standard classics such as The Sleeping Beauty, Giselle, and Swan Lake. Due to the departure of the great ballerina Alicia Markova, Fonteyn then moved up the ranks quickly.

She loved dancing the romantic heroines and her first major role was in Frederick Ashton’s new ballet Le Baiser de la Fee in 1935. Fonteyn was Ashton’s muse and in her autobiography, she writes that although she had to work hard to master his creations, her happiest moments on stage were dancing in his ballets.

He created leading roles for her in Apparitions, Nocturne, Les Patineurs, A Wedding Bouquet, Horoscope, the Wise Virgins, Dante Sonata, The Wanderer, The Quest, Ondine and Daphnis, and Chloe.

De Valois also created roles for Dame Margot Fonteyn De Arias in Orpheus and Euridyce and Don Quixote.

She was the first ballerina in George Balanchine’s Ballet Imperial.

During World War II the company had a full schedule and were performing to all types of audiences including troops in Brussels.

In 1949 she danced her first performance in the United States which was triumphantly received.

Dame Margot Fonteyn De Arias

Fonteyn was well known for her pas de deux work (partnered work). She worked with both Robert Helpmann and Michael Sommes for many years.

She danced in Paris in Les Demoiselles de la Nuit in 1948 with Roland Petit.

In her forties, she started thinking about retirement, but then met Rudolf Nureyev who had just left Russia at the age of 23. They became a dynamic team and became known as the perfect partnership. The combination of his spirit and her technique which was at its best made it joint artistry.

They performed Giselle, Swan Lake, Romeo, and Juliet. Ashton created Marguerite et Armand especially for them and Martha Graham created Lucifer just for them.

For the next fifteen years, they performed all over the world. It is rumored that they once received a 40-minute ovation and had 43 curtain calls.

Dame Margo Fonteyn De Arias was the most versatile British ballerina after World War II. Her black hair, pale face, and luminous eyes, as well as her engaging smile, were her trademarks.

She also had amazing musicality, a beautiful physique, a gentle loving manner and a soft style of movement with exquisite lines. This created a strong connection with audiences all over the world.

Her presentation of Princess Aurora in the Sleeping Beauty is considered the ultimate interpretation ever of that role.

She had an exceptionally long career and only had her farewell performance in London’s Royal Opera House at the age of 60.

Dame Margo Fonteyn De Arias’s Personal Life

Margo Fonteyn got married at the age of 36 in Paris to a man she had met in her youth – Robert E Arias, also known as Tito.  He was the son of the former president of Panama. He became the Panamanian ambassador in London and was actively involved in the politics of Panama.

He became paralyzed when he was attacked by a political opponent and the couple continued their separate careers, yet always remained connected, even when they were working far apart.

In 1956 Dame Margo Fonteyn De Arias was made a Dame of the British Empire.

In 1979 she became ‘prima ballerina absoluta’ which is a title only given to three ballerinas in the 20th century.

She became the president of the Royal Academy of Dancing in 1954 and annually organized and presented a gala matinee, persuading famous dancers from all the major companies to appear.

She wrote her autobiography while still dancing in 1975 and in 1979 she presented the television series and book The Magic of Dance.

A documentary was made about her on her Panamanian ranch to celebrate her 70th birthday.

She died on the 21st of February 1991 at the age of 72, two years after her husband.

If you would like to find out more about Dame Margot Fonteyn de Arias and her life story, these books below can be purchased online by simply clicking on them. You can also watch the most interesting documentary on her below.

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12 thoughts on “Dame Margot Fonteyn De Arias”

  1. Thanks so much for this Post. First of all I adored this Prima Ballerina Assoluta & saw many of her performances in London 1957-58 & even her Romeo and Juliet in NY in 1965. During my recent interview by Alastair Macaulay for Oral History recordings at the Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center, NY, as I went down memory lane I had a flash of having attended BALLET IMPERIAL with Fonteyn in 1949 but thought I must have mis-remembered since I assumed this was a ballet created in honour of her coronation in 1956, having no idea that the Saddlers Wells Ballet did Balanchine then!!!
    Thanks also for the history and reminding me that I JUSt missed her birthday!

    1. Hi Rajika, and it looks like I will have to recheck my facts there. I will research and make corrections as necessary. Thank you for stopping by and I find it amazing that some people my age have never even heard of her.

  2. Dame Margot Fonteyn de Arias sounds like a wonderful person and dancer too. She is definitely a legend and as I was reading through your article I kept thinking back to try and remember if I ever got to see her perform, either on TV or otherwise.

    I think I remember her from her television series The Magic of Dance. She was also a very personable person who had a ready smile as I remember it. I had no idea that this was her 100th birthday, but it is fitting that she is remembered on this day because she made such an impact on dancing…

    I had no idea that her career spanned so many decades! How many dancers can say they were active in the business for 45 years? Very few I am sure. She also served in some very influential roles over the years, which was also news to me. You have enlightened me to the greatness of Dame Margot Fonteyn de Arias, and I appreciate your work putting this together.

    Did you ever have a chance to meet her? I wish I had… I am sure that it would have been an interesting conversation with her, she likely had many tales…I will see if I can get a copy of her autobiography that she wrote in 1975, you have piqued my curiosity with the post! Thanks…

    1. Yes, you are quite correct. She did a television series called The Magic Of Dance. I have never met her although did see her dance years ago when I was a child.

  3. I have high respect for prima ballerinas knowing most of them underwent strict training and discipline by their mentors. 

    Her life seems interesting too especially that she was given the title prima ballerina absoluta, which isn’t just given if you are great, you need to be the greatest! 

    I always thought that great ballerinas came from  Russia because that is what’s always portrayed in movies.

     Anyway, thanks for sharing with us the life of Dame Margot. From time to time, it is good to know historical people who aren’t that popular and see how they changed the world in their own way. 

    1. Thanks for stopping by to comment and I tend to disagree with you that she wasn’t that popular, as she was extremely famous last century. If you grew up in the fifties, sixties or seventies, you must have been hiding under a rock if you never heard of her. 

      However, if you are young, like most of my students you have probably never heard of her unless you came across information somewhere about her.

  4. Reading this touched my soul Michel,

    40-minute ovation and 43 curtain calls, wow those are the days! That rarely happens today, people nowadays are too distracted to enjoy things in front for them but Dame Margot is certainly one of the legends we should all cherish. She really deserved the Dame title, I think her dances bring life to many people and her achievements inspire. Is there a memorial for her by any chance?

    1. I know the RAD is doing various things in her honor, but I don’t know of any other memorials. Thanks for your comment and glad you could share your thoughts on my article.

  5. Thank you for your article about Margot Fonteyn. It is really amazing to know the history and the life of Margot Fonteyn. Amazing ballet dancer she was. She had everything. Thanks for recommending the book. I would be happy to know about her more. Thank you for adding the youtube video in the post. I will check the video later.  I have a feeling its an interesting documentary about her, 

  6. Her story is amazing.  I immediately had to YouTube some videos of her dances and wow…she was so graceful.  She died when I was 1 so I had no idea who she was.  To have gone through so many mentors and teachers throughout her dancing career, it seems like she was still able to make it her own.  

    I will definitely need to check out her autobiography as your post piqued my interest and I want to learn more about her life.  I would have loved to see her dance live.   Which performances did you get to see her perform?

    1. I was young, but I remember being mesmerized. I think it was swan lake as she was in a white tutu and there were lots of girls in white long tutu’s. If not swan lake, then Gizelle. I am upset that I can’t find a program from back then, but then maybe my Mom didn’t purchase one.

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